Editorial Simplified : 14th May

//Editorial Simplified : 14th May

Editorial Simplified : 14th May

Editorial Simplified : 14th day of May 2016

This Series of posts covers the essential Editorial from prominent newspapers. The Editorial from the newspapers are compiled by the Subject Teachers form the Academy and provided in notes format so that the aspirants does not waste their precious time in sifting through the newspapers. 

The aspirants are advised to bookmark this page for future reference 

Click on the tab below to read the Editorial Simplified for each newspaper

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Editorial : A disappointing verdict

Context

The editorial expresses concern on the recent Supreme Court verdict upholding provisions of  Indian Penal Code that make defamation a criminal offence.

Critical Analysis

  • The Supreme Court has upheld the criminality of defamation which has been in modern times made just a civil offence with examples present at many places in the world.
  • The Court has sought to create an artificial balance between the fundamental right of free speech under Article 19(1)(a) ans the right to reputation under Article 21.
  • When an individual has recourse to sue respondents in civil Courts for damage to reputation there is hardly any justification to keep the criminal option open.
  • In Indian context criminal defamation has often proved to be a shield for public servants, political leaders and institutions against critical scrutiny.
  • The court could have read down Section 199 of Criminal Procedure Code which allows public prosecutors to step into shoes of defamed public servants as it seems unfair for the State to suppress criticism using its machinery without the public servant personally testifying for the loss of reputation.

Conclusion

The faith the court has reposed in the public prosecutors and lower court judges to apply their mind before instituting cases or issuing summons is worrying. Perhaps the last hope for scrapping this provision lies in the Parliament.


Editorial : BCCI after Shashank Manohar

Context

Shashank Manohar had recently resigned as the President of Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and now has been elected as the Chairman of International Cricket Council (ICC). The editorial examines the situation.

Background

  • Beginning with controversies of conflict of interests from the Indian Premiere league, the BCCI had come under the scanner.
  • The board’s functioning was scrutinised by the Supreme Court which made extraordinary interventions.
  • The Court appointed Lodha panel to clean up the working of BCCI, the recommendations of which are still to be implemented in totality.
  • The reason behind Mr Manohar’s resignation is still unclear- whether it was on account of his inability to tide over the Lodha storm or he simply saw it as a prerequisite for election as ICC chairman.

Present Situation

Mr Manohar’s fresh stint at ICC will be closely watched to see whether he will be able to bring coherence to ICC especially to the calender of cricket.

Issues

  • Post Indian Premiere League cricket is allegedly played to the dictates of the game’s most profitable territories India, Australia and England.
  • The future tours programme which promises all ICC full members assurance if matches against each other needs revival.
  • BCCI has been alleged to force its agenda on other boards arbitrarily.
  • At the national level various lobbies are at work trying to gather numbers required for taking the post of BCCI president.

Future and Analysis

  • Whoever replaces Mr Manohar as BCCI president will first have to contend with Lodha panel’s recommendations which include provision such as cap of 70 years for office bearers and a representative of Comptroller and Auditor General of India to oversee financial transactions.
  • Whether or not Mr Manohar would be able to deal with International cricket’s issue remains a matter of speculation.
  • But for the BCCI the top item on agenda should be to avert a slide back to the board’s bad old ways and reverse its impression as an opaque, old boy’s club.

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By | 2016-05-15T21:50:45+00:00 May 15th, 2016|Categories: Editorial Simplified|Tags: , |0 Comments

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