Delegates from 196 countries — Parties to the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) — are meeting in Montreal, Canada from December 7-21 with the aim to hammer out a new global agreement on halting environmental loss.

 

Details

  • Many of the 24 conservation targets under discussion at the 15th Conference of the Parties (COP15) aim to avoid past mistakes and improve on the world’s last set of conservation goals — the Aichi Biodiversity Targets that expired in 2020.
  • No single country met all 20 Aichi Targets within its own borders, according to a September 2020 UN assessment.

 

The Aichi Targets

  • The Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) adopted the Aichi Biodiversity Targets at the Nagoya conference in 2010.
  • The Aichi Biodiversity Targets laid out a 10-year plan (Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020), which had 20 global biodiversity targets, divided under five goals, with a deadline of 2020.
    • Strategic Goal A — Address the underlying causes of biodiversity loss by mainstreaming biodiversity across government and society.
    • Strategic Goal B — Reduce the direct pressures on biodiversity and promote sustainable use.
    • Strategic Goal C — Improve the status of biodiversity by safeguarding ecosystems, species and genetic diversity.
    • Strategic Goal D — Enhance the benefits to all from biodiversity and ecosystem services.
    • Strategic Goal E — Enhance implementation through participatory planning, knowledge management and capacity building
  • It included goals such as reducing deforestation by at least half during the coming decade and curbing pollution so that it no longer harmed ecosystems.
  • Many of the targets, however, included vague language and did not hold countries to a specific action.
  • After parties adopted the Aichi Targets, they were expected to devise their own national biodiversity strategies that would mimic the goals laid out by Aichi.
  • Nearly all parties created these strategies, but most were never fully implemented.