(Environment & Ecology)General Studies Paper 1General Studies Paper 2General Studies Paper 3 (Social Issues) (Social Justice)
Question:- 27. Discuss the salient features of Forest Rights Act, 2006. Answer in 150 words.
Jul 29, 2022
Answer:-

INTRODUCTION:

The symbiotic relationship between forests and forest-dwelling communities found recognition in the National Forest Policy, 1988. The policy called for the need to associate tribal people in the protection, regeneration and development of forests. The Scheduled Tribes and Other Traditional Forest Dwellers (Recognition of Forest Rights) Act, 2006 or  the Forest Rights Act was enacted to protect the marginalised socio-economic class of citizens and balance the right to environment with their right to life and livelihood. It deals with the rights of the communities that dwell in the forests (including Scheduled Tribes), over land and other resources, which have been denied to them over the years because of the continuation of forest laws from the colonial era in the country.

 

LINKAGE POINT: The features of the act are discussed below:

 

BODY PARAGRAPH:

  1. 1.The act recognizes and vests the forest rights and occupation in Forest land in forest Dwelling Scheduled Tribes (FDST) and Other Traditional Forest Dwellers (OTFD) who have been residing in such forests for generations.
  2. 2.The act also establishes the responsibilities and authority for sustainable use, conservation of biodiversity and maintenance of ecological balance of FDST and OTFD. It strengthens the conservation regime of the forests while ensuring livelihood and food security of the FDST and OTFD. The act identifies four types of rights:
  • -Title rights -It gives FDST and OTFD the right to ownership to land farmed by tribals or forest dwellers subject to a maximum of 4 hectares. Ownership is only for land that is actually being cultivated by the concerned family and no new lands will be granted.
  • -Use rights – The rights of the dwellers extend to extracting Minor Forest Produce, grazing areas, to pastoralist routes, etc.
  • -Relief and development rights- To rehabilitation in case of illegal eviction or forced displacement and to basic amenities, subject to restrictions for forest protection
  • -Forest management rights- It includes the right to protect, regenerate or conserve or manage any community forest resource which they have been traditionally protecting and conserving for sustainable use.
  1. Members or community of the Scheduled Tribes who primarily reside in and who depend on the forests or forest lands for bona fide livelihood needs can claim these rights.
  2. It can also be claimed by any member or community who has for at least three generations (75 years) prior to the 13th day of December, 2005 primarily resided in forests land for bona fide livelihood needs.
  3. The Gram Sabha is the authority to initiate the process for determining the nature and extent of Individual Forest Rights (IFR) or Community Forest Rights (CFR) or both that may be given to FDST and OTFD.

 

CHALLENGES:

  1. Implementation of the act remains the biggest challenge as acts related to the environment are not entirely compliant with the law, illegal encroachments have happened as much as that claims have been unfairly rejected.
  2. As tribals are not a big vote bank in most states, governments find it convenient to subvert FRA or not bother about it at all in favour of monetary gains
  3. Lack of awareness at the lower level of forest officials who are supposed to help process forest rights claims is high and majority of the aggrieved population too remains in the dark regarding their rights.
  4. The forest bureaucracy has misinterpreted the FRA as an instrument to regularise encroachment instead of a welfare measure for tribals.

 

WAY FORWARD:

  • At the local level, large-scale public awareness and information efforts are necessary, informing both tribe and lower-level officials. The government should take a more active role in pressuring states to comply with legislation that has the potential to affect millions of people’s lives.
  • The recognition of CFR rights would shift forest governance in India towards a community conservation regime that is more food security and livelihood oriented.
  • Large-scale awareness and information dissemination campaigns are required at local level informing both tribal and lower level officials.
  • It is important to develop a detailed strategy of training and capacity building of people responsible for implementing the FRA, such as Panchayats, Gram Sabha, village level Forest Rights committee etc.
  • The relevant maps and documents should be made available to the Forest rights committee and claimants to simplify the task of the Gram Sabha in identifying and filing claims for individual and community rights.
  • Providing clarity on the time limit for settling claims the act does not specify any time limit for resolving claims. In most of the areas, both the officials and beneficiaries are unaware of this fact. Centre should take more proactive role in pushing states to honour a law that could change the lives of millions.

The government of India views MFP rights as a means to curb Naxalism since the states most affected by Naxalism are also home to the maximum number of people dependent on forest produce. Even though the implementation of the act remains the most difficult task, the importance of this act cannot be neglected.